A form of CRISPR widely expected to be safer and possibly more effective that the original has aced its first substantive test. When CRISPR “base editing” was used to knock out two cholesterol-associated genes in monkeys, the animals’ blood levels of heart-disease-causing LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and triglycerides plunged as much as 60% and 65%, respectively, Sekar Kathiresan, co-founder and CEO of Verve Therapeutics, announced on Saturday at the (virtual) meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. The results are the first published data showing successful CRISPR base editing in a non-human primate; there have been similar successes in mice. Learn More